Laugh for Life Sciences: 10 #Coronalife Work-From-Home Fails

Working from home isn’t quite what we life science professionals anticipated. The expectation: No alarm clock, no commute, and much better coffee. The reality: Screaming kids, annoying spouses, and Netflix distractions. Plus, we’re constantly disinfecting doorknobs, countertops, takeout cartons. So this is the “new normal” they warned us about.

In a pre-COVID world, we’d be sitting around the conference table brainstorming a product launch. Post-COVID, our favorite colleagues are the kitchen table, the fridge, and someone called Zoom.

We didn’t sign up for this.

Still, there are reasons to be cheerful. Here at SOURCE EXPLORER, we took a deep dive into the internet to find the funniest work-from-home fails that you might appreciate right now.

Now we need to get back to work!

#1. When You Turn Yourself into a Potato

This one made us chuckle.

Meet Lizet Ocampo. Like many of us in life science, she’s been working from home and video-conferencing colleagues.

So far, so good.

A few weeks back, Lizet was playing around with some filters on Microsoft Teams. One, in particular, grabbed her attention: It morphed her face into a potato. The only problem? She completely forgot to remove it.

A few days later, and Lizet had an important business meeting. She logged into Teams, and this happened:

Luckily, her colleagues saw the funny side.

#2. When Your Partner Interrupts Your Zoom Call With the Boss

If you’re unlucky enough to be living with your partner during quarantine, you already know the struggle. Coffee mugs around the house, stupid jokes, and the sudden realization that they chew really loudly — love under lockdown isn’t exactly a fairytale.

But what if your partner interrupted your Zoom call with the boss? And did it in their underwear? And then walked into the wall?

This is exactly what happened to someone. Thankfully for us, it was caught on camera:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJhiDgHSIRs

#3. When Spiderman Appears on Your Conference Call

With great power comes great responsibility — or a four-year-old perched on the kitchen table in the middle of a conference call.

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#4. When You’re Secretly Hoping Zoom is Audio-Only

Hair salons closed their doors weeks ago, and most of us are well overdue a trim. Still, we’re making the effort when we need to — but only if there’s video on conference calls. Right now, the audio-only feature is much more convenient.

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#5. When Your Little Kid Video-Bombs Your Conference Call

We were told working from home would be simple. Not when your little one hijacks your conference call, it’s not.

#6. When Your Cat Becomes Your Executive Assistant

“Work from home,” they said. “It will be easy.”

They lied. Pets never make life easy.

#7. When Someone Sends a 1-Hour Zoom Meeting Invite For Something That Could Be Settled in an Email

Credit to stem cell biologist and science communicator Samantha Yammine, Ph.D., for sharing this one.

It’s funny because it’s true.

#8. When You Can’t Dress Up for Work Events

With most life science networking events postponed, some of us have had to be creative. Digital marketing specialist Lucy Rogers wears different designer gowns while in quarantine — and posts them on her Instagram.

Check out Say Yes to the WFH Dress here!

#9. When Your Interview on the News Becomes the News

OK, this one’s an old one, but it’s always worth a re-watch.

When BBC News interviewed Professor Robert Kelly at home, he was supposed to be talking about South Korea. Then something unexpected happened…

#10. When You Have Way More Time in the Kitchen

This one’s definitely not a fail, but we thought we’d leave you one of the perks of working from home: Proximity to the kitchen!

One of our favorite life science influencers, biotech and pharma reporter Lisa Jarvis, got creative in the kitchen while in quarantine and cooked these delicious cinnamon rolls:

Any funny fails we need to know about? Tweet @SourceExplorer or email us!